Honored Again As The Best Bed & Breakfast in East Hawaii

The Palms Cliff House has the honor of being named the Best Bed & Breakfast in East Hawaii by readers of the Hawaii Tribune-Herald Newspaper for 2013. The Inn also won in 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009 and 2005. John and Michele Gamble share the honor with their hard working staff, some of whom are shown below.. “We are able to be so successful because we have such wonderful and dedicated staff that share our dream for this very special place” said owner Michele Gamble.

Celebrating fourteen years in operation the Gambles feel this is the perfect pat on the back for a job well done by their neighbors and peers. “We all work so hard to provide a quality experience while still providing value for the guest” commented John Gamble, “The economy is really tight for everyone, and yet, we are still providing value for every dollar a guest spends with us.”

“We are so thankful to the people of the Big Island for giving us this honor again this year. There are so many Bed and Breakfasts out there who are working hard and providing a quality experience, so we understand what a tremendous honor it is to be given this award by the people who live here” Michele said in conclusion.

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Nona Beamer: A Legacy of Aloha

"Nona Beamer: A Legacy of Aloha" is a portrait in film painted with the words of some of the people profoundly affected by this remarkable Hawaiian woman. She was a musician, hula dancer, composer and teacher, at a time when Hawaiian culture was still being suppressed in. She was a major force behind the Cultural Renaissance of the 1970s that helped restore dignity and pride to Hawaiian children. Join filmmaker Linda Kane for a special screening of this remarkable film.

Nona Beamer has a special place in my heart, she was my teacher, my adviser, my confidant, and my friend. I am honored to have participated in the making of this film and urge everyone, if you knew Auntie Nona or not, to go see this film. You will leave the theater feeling as if you did know her and filled with a deeper understanding of Hawaii's past and a true sense of Aloha. Something she very much would have liked.

 

BIG ISLAND 'UKULELE GUILD'S 8th ANNUAL 'UKULELE EXHIBITION

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

October 5-25 (weekdays) Will be held in conjunction with the annual Wailoa Center Invitational Woodworkers Show. Opening "Meet Your Makers!" reception on October 5th, from 5-7pm with pupus and live entertainment. October 6 and 20th from noon till 4pm, join in a kanikapila and 'ukulele lessons with Andy Andrews of the Puna 'Ukulele Kanikapila Association (free to the public).

Wailoa Art & Cultural Center is a Division of State Parks, Department of Land and Natural Resources. It is free and open to the public Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., & Wednesday from noon to 4:30 pm., but will open especially for the PUKA kanikapila on Oct. 6 & 20th. For more info about the Uke Guild show, contact Bob Gleason at 966-6323 or email pegasusguitars@hawaiiantel.net. Wailoa Center info at 933-0416 or email wailoa@yahoo.com.

Award of Excellence for The Palms Cliff House Inn

Dear Palms Cliff House Inn,

We At TripAdvisor recognize the power of traveler feedback - and today, we're proud to recognize The Palms Cliff House Inn for your exceptional traveler ratings over the past year.

The Award of Excellence recognizes businesses that consistently earn top ratings from TripAdvisor travelers. With a rating of 4.0, The Palms Cliff House Inn has earned a place among the very best.

Thank you for being a part of TripAdvisor's global business community.

Sincerely,

President, TripAdvisor

Saving a Piece of Hawaii's Past

Last weekend John and I happened to stop at a local garage sale and while rummaging through their "Trash" pile I noticed a large hunk of wood sticking out towards the back. Thinking I was looking at a large piece of mid-century monkey pod wood I freed the piece of wood from the pile. As soon as I grab a hold of it I knew I was about to reveal something special because my fingers were not feeling the smooth underside of a monkey pod wood item, but the 'chip carving' texture synonymous with the Kulani Prison Farm wood shop.

Sure enough when I turned the piece over the distinctive back of the item gave away it's origin. Sadly, the item itself was in really bad condition. The top surface of the shell shaped platter had been painted a brick red and then covered in a thick varnish.

On top of that some tar like substance had spilled on the piece and pooled in it's bottom.

There edges were chipped and broken. The back of the platter was in much the same condition. So when I asked about purchasing the platter it was no wonder I got an odd response. The piece was in such bad shape that the kind folks let me have it for $7.00. Happily I handed them some money and took my damaged treasure home.

I carefully examined the platter to determine as many of it's issues as possible before mapping out my place to salvage it. Nicks, chips, a large break on one end and the goo that was pooled in the center of the piece would be a challenge to overcome.

Undaunted I began stripping away the goo and various layers of paint and varnish. One day and a full can of stripper later I had revealed the natural beauty of the Koa wood that the Kulani Prison Farm was famous for using.

I then decided to hand sand out the chips and nicks so as not to remove too much wood and interfere with the back's 'chip carving.' The large break was a bit more difficult to tackle, but luckily the wood was thick in that area and I was able to re-shape the bowl to remove the broken area, again, without interfering with the 'chip carving' on the back side.

I put a sparing amount of oil onto the piece over the next few days and watched in amazement as the oil was soaked up as if on a dry sponge. After several days of oiling though, the shell platter looks spectacular. I am really happy with how the restoration turned out and really proud that I was able to save a piece of Hawaii's past for my guests to enjoy.

Kūlani Prison Farm was opened in 1946 near Kūlani  Hill above Hilo. Inmates at the Prison Farm participated in logging, ranching, woodworking, and other activities. The Farm was constructed among “beautiful stands of Koa trees.” Today, the area surrounding the former prison farm contains dense populations of native birds and plants and is part of a protected conservation area. An important part of the program at the Kūlani facility was its’ wood workshop and sales venture. For years, inmates collected native hardwoods from lands around the facility, and turned it into art and utilitarian items for sale. A part of the income went to the benefit of the inmates themselves, and provides them with a trade skill. This Shell shaped platter exhibits the distinctive ‘Kūlani Prison Farm’ style of texturing the underside (Chip Carving) of the platter making it as beautiful as the top of the platter. ‘Kūlani Prison Farm’ items are difficult to find today, so bringing this platter back to life was well worth the effort.