Merrie Monarch Hawaiian Culture Enrichment 2014 Workshops at Imiloa

April 23 to 25, 2014

In April, the week after Easter, the highly anticipated Merrie Monarch Hula Festival and Competition in Hilo will be under way. During this special week, ‘Imiloa will offer a three-day showcase of musical performances and cultural presentations in support of the Merrie Monarch Festival, providing visitors to Hawai‘i and its residents an opportunity to learn about the history and cultural significance of hula and its practitioners. All showcase sessions cover a wide range of hula topics.
This year’s programs consist of a wonderful mix of cultural presentations such as Haku Mele Masters with a prominent group of Hawaiian poets and songwriters, a special presentation on Hawaiian protocol for entering the Waonahele or forests by Dr. Taupouri Tangaro and Kekuhi Kealiikanakaolehaililani, and musical performances by Manu Boyd, Hoku Zuttermeister, and Kuana Torres. Share in the magic of Merrie Monarch Week at ‘Imiloa!
In order to continue to offer more educational enrichment programs, event program is by admission: $6 for members, $8 for non-members, per session. Seating is limited. To ensure a spot for a session, we recommend that you purchase tickets in advance. Tickets are non-refundable. Ticket pre-sales start Tuesday, March 25th. Please call 969-9703 or visit the guest service desk at ‘Imiloa to purchase tickets.

2014 Schedule 

 

Wednesday, April 23
10:00am:
  Presentation, "Haku Mele Masters of Our Time"
A panel of celebrated, contemporary Haku Mele (composers) discuss the art involved in the composition of Hawaiian songs, providing insight into the elements that inspire haku mele, the practice of documenting our history through poetry and song and the performance of mele as a means of storytelling.

Speakers include Larry Kimura, Kainani Kahaunaele, Manu Boyd and Manaiakalani Kalua.

Moderated by Dr. Hiapo Perreira.
1:00pm:
Musical Performance by Manu Boyd. Noted Hawaiian composer, kumu hula and Na Hoku Hanohano Award winning recording artist, Manu Boyd performs mele from his latest solo release.
Manu Boyd is recognized as a Hawaiian language and cultural expert, composer, arranger, singer, chanter, choreographer, producer and writer. Since June 2007, he has served as Hawaiian cultural director at Royal Hawaiian Center at Helumoa, Waikiki, the world-class shopping/dining/entertainment hub owned by Kamehameha Schools and managed by The Festival Companies.
Manu leads the award-winning hula school, Halau O Ke ‘A‘ali‘i Ku Makani, est. 1997 - first-place overall winners at the 2012 Merrie Monarch Festival.  From 1986 - 2012, Manu led the well-known Hawaiian recording ensemble Ho‘okena, multiple Na Hoku Hanohano Awards winner and two-time Grammy nominee.
Thursday, April 24
10:00am:
'OiwiTV's Presentation on the original series “Na Loea: The Masters.” The original film series by 'OiwiTV promotes and perpetuates kuana'ike Hawai'i, or a Hawaiian worldview, through the engaging stories of a select group of masters whose collective knowledge represents an amazing cross section of cultural wisdom.
This kuana'ike is embedded in values that influence all aspects of a person’s way of thinking, being, and acting. These values are dependent on Hawaiian norms including a symbiotic tie with the land, the interdependence of language and culture, the significance of interpersonal relationships, and the practical, continuous application of traditional knowledge. Engage with Na loea for a look into what is helping to keep Hawai'i Hawai'i.
For more on the Na Loea series and 'Oiwi TV, visit oiwi.tv. LOEA: Jerry Ongies “Hawai'iloa: Rebuilding the Legend” While the ancient art of non-instrument navigation has been rekindled throughout Polynesia, the knowledge of canoe building has been largely forgotten except for a select few artisans. Following in the wake of her sister canoe Hokule'a, the Hawai'iloa canoe was hulled from two spruce logs gifted from the tribes of Alaska to prove the ingenuity of traditional building and voyaging techniques. But with the passing of her original builder – Wright “Wrighto” Bowman – Hawai'iloa was left to wait for another master craftsman. With a steady hand and unwavering dedication, Jerry Ongies is breathing new life into one of Hawai'i's most storied sailing canoes.

LOEA: Mac Poepoe, “Malama Mo'omomi” For locals on the rural Hawaiian island of Moloka'i, the “ice box” isn’t just the refrigerator in their kitchens but the abundant ocean that still provides a main source of sustenance for that community; a community that has fought against development and many modern “conveniences” with great resolve to maintain their unique island lifestyle. Malama Mo'omomi features “Mac” Poepoe, a native Hawaiian fisherman and community leader on Moloka'i, who has dedicated his life to sharing his knowledge of traditional resource management with the hope of ensuring that this ocean “ice box” will be well-stocked for generations to come. Mac’s wealth of knowledge and expertise accumulated over his years of growing up in the rigor and lifestyle of a Hawaiian family that has been fishing and maintaining the sustainability of these waters for generations. (It could be said that) Mac is one of a small group (or “one of a dying breed”) of skilled fisherman who approach their practice with a passion not just for the sport of it but to hone and perpetuate their skill and expertise in managing Hawai'i's ocean ecosystems, which is critical to the sustainability of Hawai‘i and its people. This humble fisherman is a giant resource for Hawai'i's future.

LOEA: Keone Nunes, “Ancestral Ink” This is the story of traditional Hawaiian kakau (tattoo) artist, Keone Nunes, and the journey of cultural re-discovery inherent in kakau uhi (tattooing). The process of kakau uhi is one where the artist guides their subjects down a path of self-discovery, revealing life lessons of who they are and where they come from. Traditional kakau is an art that was nearly lost to Hawaiians, but Keone’s perseverance to learn, practice and teach this craft has been a critical determiner of its survival and resurgence in the Hawaiian community today. This piece was shot primarily on the Leeward coast of O'ahu in the Nanakuli and Wai'anae communities, where Keone resides and practices his art of kakau uhi.

1:00pm:
Musical Performance by Hoku Zuttermeister. Hoku Zuttermeister, winner of numerous Na Hoku Hanohano Awards, including Male Vocalist of the Year, Entertainer of the Year and Hawaiian Album of the Year, performs timeless Hawaiian music from his album, ‘Aina Kupuna, and shares memories of his great-grandmother, Hula Master, Kau‘i Zuttermeister.
Hoku comes from a Hawaiian family dynasty that encompasses both the hula and music communities.  His great-grandmother, Kau‘i Zuttermeister penned the beloved song, “Na Pua Lei ‘Ilima,” and his great-aunt is Kumu Hula Noe Zuttermeister.
Hoku’s love of Hawaiian music was inspired by great Hawaiian composers and musicians like Kawena Puku‘i, Maddy Lam and Frank Kawaikapuokalani Hewett, Genoa Keawe, the Brothers Cazimero and many others. He takes their songs to heart and re-interprets them in his own style with his wide vocal range and versatile instrumentation. Hoku says, “it’s more about the heart and feel of the song than the notes and chords.”
Friday, April 25
10:00am:
Presentation "He Inoa No Hi'iaka"
This is a special presentation on Hawaiian protocol for entering the Waonahele and its importance to Hula by Dr. Taupouri Tangaro and Kekuhi Kealiikanakaoleohaililani
1:00pm: 
Musical Performance by Kuana Torres.
Coming from an impressive lineage of musicians, including Bill Ali‘iloa Lincoln, Victor Kala, the Lim Family and George Holokai, Kuana Torres began composing, arranging and playing traditional Hawaiian music at an early age. In 1995 Kuana, with Kehau Tamure, formed the award wining duo, Na Palapalai. From the meteoric rise of their debut CD, Makana ‘Olu, they have maintained a prominent presence in the local and international Hawaiian music and hula scene.

Kuana released his first greatly anticipated solo CD in 2011 and went on to win seven Na Hoku Hanohano awards in 2012, including Album of the Year, Song of the Year and Male Vocalist of the Year awards. Fans know Kuana for his incredible vocal range, while fellow musicians seek him out for his songwriting, arranging and producing talents. Kuana continues to set the pace for talented, local musicians with a steady stream of new compositions that are sure to become Hawaiian music classics.

Panoramic Eggs

‘Imiloa welcomes accomplished artist and designer, Eileen Tokita. EileenTokita has been creating and teaching Faberge’ Eggs for over 40 years.  With her own unique signature design, she has garnered world acclaim from some of the most respected artists and has even been featured at the White House.  Eileen is a master at her craft and has created some of the most intricate and stunning creations from a variety of real eggs. Eileen is a native of Seattle, Washington and currently resides in Honolulu.  In celebration of Spring, we are excited to offer a class with Eileen to make the following project from a real duck egg.   Panoramic Egg Classtokita egg

  • Saturday, April 5
  • 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. in the ‘Imiloa Classroom
  • Cost for class and kit: $50 members, $65 non-members
  • Please contact the front desk to enroll for the class.  808-969-9703
  • enrollment deadline is March 25.

Space is limited so sign up soon!  Supplies will be provided, however the following are optional for your convenience:  Old kitchen towel, blow dryer, small sharp scissors, cuticle scissors.

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i is located at 600 ‘Imiloa Place in Hilo, off Komohana and Nowelo Streets at the UH Hilo Science and Technology Park. For more information, go to www.imiloahawaii.org, or call (808) 969-9703.

I Want the Wide American Earth

Wide Earth

I Want the Wide American Earth: An Asian Pacific American Story Traveling Exhibit to Open March 22nd at ‘Imiloa

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center is pleased to host the exhibit “I Want the Wide American Earth: An Asian Pacific American Story,” March 22 – June 1, 2014 as part of a 13-city national tour.

As the only state with an Asian plurality, Hawai‘i lives and breathes its diverse Asian Pacific heritage every day, but a new Smithsonian exhibition opening at the ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center will offer perspectives on our local heritage within the broader context of the entire nation.  The ancestral roots of Asian and Pacific Americans represent more than 50% of the world’s population, extending from East Asia to Southeast Asia, and from South Asia to the Pacific Islands and Polynesia.

In this first exhibition of its kind, the Smithsonian celebrates Asian Pacific American history across a multitude of diverse cultures and explores how Asian Pacific Americans have shaped and been shaped by the course of the nation’s history. “I Want the Wide American Earth” tells the rich and complex stories of the very first Asian immigrants, including their participation in key moments in American history: Asian immigrants panned in the Gold Rush, hammered ties in the Transcontinental Railroad, fought on both sides in the Civil War and helped build the nation’s agricultural system.

Through the decades, Asian immigrants struggled against legal exclusion, manzanar_historical_site_Blue_AAcivil rights violations and unlawful detention, such as the 120,000 Japanese who were interred during World War II. Since the 1960s, vibrant new communities, pan-Asian, Pacific Islander and cross-cultural in make-up, have blossomed.

The banner exhibition is complemented by an e-book, which is a 14-page illustrated adaption of the exhibition. Produced in collaboration with SI Universe Media, creators of the first-ever Asian Pacific American comics anthology, the e-book will tell the Asian Pacific American story in graphic narrative, featuring work by seven Asian Pacific American comic artists. The e-book is free to download and viewable on all tablet devices and e-readers.

The exhibit also features a mobile tour app, which includes interviews with authors Maxine Hong Kingston and Monique Truong; U.S. Secretary of Transportation Norman Mineta; Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center director Konrad Ng; activist Deepa Iyer; and U.S. retired major general Antonio Taguba.

Curated by Lawrence-Ming Bùi Davis, Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center Initiative coordinator, “I Want the Wide American Earth” is a moving, dramatic and evocative narrative of Asian Pacific American history and culture.

The Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center produces programs and exhibitions about the Asian Pacific American experience and works in partnership with organizations across the Smithsonian and beyond to enrich collections and activities about the Asian Pacific American experience. It shares the challenges and stories of America’s fastest-growing communities. It connects treasures and scholars with the public, celebrates long-lived traditions and explores contemporary expressions. The stories it tells are vital to a deeper understanding of the nation and a richer appreciation of Asian Pacific cultures. Visit www.apa.si.edu for more information.

The Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES)has been sharing the wealth of Smithsonian collections and research programs with millions of people outside Washington, D.C., for 60 years. SITES connects Americans to their cultural heritage through a wide range of exhibitions about art, science and history, which are shown wherever people live, work and play.

The National Museum of American History collects, preserves and displays American heritage in the areas of social, political, cultural, scientific and military history. The Museum is located at 14th Street and Constitution Avenue N.W. and is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Check the website for special extended summer hours.

Tsukimi-Moon Viewing

Enjoy the Moon this weekend by celebrating with 'Imiloa at the Tsukimi-Moon Viewing event tonight, Friday night Sept 28. The night will include a 6 p.m. Moons of our Solar System live sky presentation in the planetarium, followed by a presentation of Moon stories in other cultural paradigms, meteorite and lunar science exhibits, and moon viewing in the lawn (weather permitting.) A traditional snack of mochi will be available for the participants. Join us in celebrating the beauty of the Moon!

For more information:

http://blog.imiloahawaii.org/general-information/tsukimi-moon-viewing/