Finding History at Waikapuna

John and I have made a point of 'getting to know' our Island during the 20 years we have lived here. It is a wonderful place to explore and was a joyful playground for our two sons when they were young. One of the places that has continued to draw us back time and again is the coastal shoreline from Kaalualu Bay to Kii. For those not familiar with the Big Island, I am speaking of the district of Kau, along the coast, near what is commonly known as South Point.  We travel there several times a year, to camp, to fish, to hike, and to explore. Our last visit to the area was this past week.

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Now, I must quantify that four wheeling in this area is not a riotous romp across the countryside.  It is a slow and cautious journey across a'a'  and pahoehoe lava fields. Usually we get distracted by something we see and hop from the Pathfinder to go explore on foot. But as I said, it was unusually windy on this particular day.  As a result, we explored in our Pathfinder much farther than we had ever gone before.

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Armed with both modern and really old maps of the area we pinpointed several locations by name, something we had been hoping to do for years. But the peak of our adventures was to reach the end of the tidal areas and come face to face with the southern end of the Kau Cliff line. What makes this area so special is that long ago it was home to a small fishing village, known as Waikapuna.

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This area is actually privately owned, but we know the owners and land managers and ALWAYS ask before we go for permission. Asking first is not only the right thing to do, it is the local thing to do. We had a wonderful time exploring the remains of old walls and buildings and of course the beautiful bay and ocean.

Waikapuna is testament to the changing nature of the Big Island. Waikapuna had been a thriving fishing village with fresh water springs located on old lava tubes. A series of earthquakes in the area changed the water table and ended the fresh water supply. Thus ended the once thriving fishing village. This all happened in the late 1800’s. It is still a beautiful spot, though it’s remote And difficult location makes it a place few can enjoy. Hopefully you may enjoy it vicariously though our photos.

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The winds swept the coast with more force than we were accustomed to (and the area is know for it's wind), as a result we did less hiking and more four wheel driving (NOT for the faint of heart or rental car) over sharp lava fields. Trust me, the last thing you want to happen in a remote area is to be blown over onto sharp lava.  

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HAWAII VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK (BIVN) - Pele returns to the Pacific Ocean, after suddenly crossing the emergency road on the coastal plain of Kilauea.

by Big Island Video News on July 26, 2016 at 7:26 am UPDATE (12:40 p.m.) VIDEO: First Look At Hawaii’s New Lava Ocean Entry HAWAII VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK, Hawaii – The 61g lava flow has reached the Pacific Ocean on Hawaii Island. The lava flow began a new ocean entry at 1:30 a.m. this morning, lava tour guides report. Shane Turpin of Lava Ocean Tours, Inc. was one of the first on the scene – by sea – to provide images of the new entry. Yesterday, the lava crossed the coastal emergency road that connects the Chain of Craters Road in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park to Kalapana. From that point it was only a matter of hours before the lava reached the sea.

The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory said the last time the lava met the ocean was in August 2013. The ocean entry stopped when the eruptive activity at Puʻu ʻŌʻō changed, sending flows to towards the east rather than the south. The new direction held for nearly three years – and included the infamous June 27 lava flow that threatened the village of Pahoa – before a new change in the lava flow redirected the activity back towards the coastal plain on Kīlauea’s south flank.

Mahalo Jared Goodwin and Lava Ocean Tours for the great pictures.

Hawaiian Havens: The Top 10 Hotels on the Big Island

The Culture Trip By:Caroline Milne, Updated: 25 December 2015

Excerpt from this article:

Hawaii’s Big Island is a textbook tropical paradise. Home to a host of natural wonders such as active volcanoes, black sand beaches, hidden waterfalls and seemingly endless jungle hikes, the island is a heavenly destination for active adventure-seekers, as well as those seeking a much-needed vacation to sprawl out on the beach and de-stress. Whatever your island fantasy involves, we’ve rounded up the top ten hotels for every type of traveler, so you can find the best accommodations for your style and budget.

Palms Cliff House Inn

Palms Cliff House Inn is a Victorian style bed and breakfast situated atop a lush Oceanside property. If you’re looking for accommodations on the Northeastern side of the island (near Hilo), Palms Cliff is the destination for you. This luxurious B&B has charm to spare, enchanting guests with its grand architecture and awe-inspiring views of the formidable Homonu Cliffs. Here you can let the rhythmic sounds of the ocean lull you to sleep at night, then wake at sunrise to a delicious breakfast. This oasis of old-world relaxation will leave you pampered and rested, though if you’re feeling bold you’ll find a range of nature activities at your doorstep, from snorkeling and swimming to hiking those striking cliffs.

Price: Luxury

Watch out for: the private jacuzzi and romantic views in Room 8

28-3514 Mamalahoa Hwy, Honomu, Island of Hawaii, HI, +808 963 6076

Living Earth-Friendly on an Island.

One aspect of living in paradise that many people don't think about is that everything, and I mean everything, is flown inn or shipped in by barge. Toilet paper, mail, food, building supplies, you name it. If it is not grown here, it is shipped in. Even if it something is made here, some part of it had to be shipped in, glue, nails, tools, tec. So when there is is mis-hap here at the inn, we try to repair items instead of running out to the stores and buying a replacement. After all, trash is not shipped off island, that is one thing that remains here. When you live on an island, you discover very quickly, just how precious space is. Recently we had such a mishap with some guests and a lamp was damaged beyond repair, life is full of accidents, no harm, no foul. Since the lamps needed to match it was a matter of what to do next. Thank goodness we live in a community (Island mentality) that embraces garage sales, Church sales, and temple sales. So bright and early Saturday morning we were off on the hunt. Right away I found a pair of lamps that would fit our needs.

   Here is one in it's "as found" condition. Yes, it is in rough shape, rusty harp, chipping paint, but good solid bones. I pulled out some paint from my craft supplies and got to work.

   A soft grey was just the thing to compliment the room it was headed into. I also brushed gold pigment on the upper edges of the lamp base for some highlight. I think the end result is fantastic! But most important, we added one less thing to our local landfill. Aloha!

     

Hawaii Magazine Reader's Choice Winner, Again!

Excited to announce that for the third year in a row we have won the Reader's Choice Award for Best Bed & Breakfast. Congratulations to all the winners in this year's list. On the stands now, go grab your copy! 


Year after year we are honored to receive the publics acknowledgement of our great staff and wonderful B&B. We pour our hearts into this place are are just thrilled (even after 15 years) when others say "well done!" Mahalo to everyone, most especially our staff, without whom, we could not exceed our guests expectations. 

 

  

  

   

  

  

Honored Again As The Best Bed & Breakfast in East Hawaii

The Palms Cliff House has the honor of being named the Best Bed & Breakfast in East Hawaii by readers of the Hawaii Tribune-Herald Newspaper for 2013. The Inn also won in 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009 and 2005. John and Michele Gamble share the honor with their hard working staff, some of whom are shown below.. “We are able to be so successful because we have such wonderful and dedicated staff that share our dream for this very special place” said owner Michele Gamble.

Celebrating fourteen years in operation the Gambles feel this is the perfect pat on the back for a job well done by their neighbors and peers. “We all work so hard to provide a quality experience while still providing value for the guest” commented John Gamble, “The economy is really tight for everyone, and yet, we are still providing value for every dollar a guest spends with us.”

“We are so thankful to the people of the Big Island for giving us this honor again this year. There are so many Bed and Breakfasts out there who are working hard and providing a quality experience, so we understand what a tremendous honor it is to be given this award by the people who live here” Michele said in conclusion.

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Ma‘i Ho‘oka‘awale ‘Ohana & The Journey Into Exile

by vrecinto on April 23rd, 2014

Ma‘i Ho‘oka‘awale ‘Ohana & The Journey Into Exile: Hansen’s Disease in Hawai‘i  “I Want the Wide American Earth: An Asian Pacific American Story” ‘Imiloa Lecture Series

The seldom told stories of Hawai‘i’s Hansen’s Disease sufferers who werenupepa clipping exiled to Molokai will come alive in their own words when ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center hosts Dr. Kerri Inglis, Chair, Department of History at UH Hilo, for her talk “Ma‘i Ho‘oka‘awale ‘Ohana & the Journey into Exile: Hansen’s Disease in Hawai‘i, 1866-1969” on Thursday, May 1, at 4:00 p.m. The talk is presented as part of a continuing series being offered in conjunction with the Smithsonian traveling exhibition, “I Want the Wide American Earth: An Asian Pacific American Story.” Attendees may also tour the exhibit, which is on display until June 1, 2014 as part of a 13-city national tour.

From 1866 to 1969, approximately 8,000 persons were quarantined or exiled to the leprosy settlement at Kalaupapa.  Endeavoring to recover the voices of the patients who lived through this significant moment in Hawaiian history, Inglis will present her research on the letters and articles that patients and their loved ones wrote to the Board of Health and Hawaiian language newspapers in the 19th century, and share oral histories that were collected in the 20th century.  Together these records tell the story of a disease, a changing society’s reaction to that disease, and the long lasting consequences of that experience for Hawai‘i and its people.

Kerri A. Inglis serves as Chair of the Department of History and Associate Professor of Hawaiian & Pacific Islands History at UH-Hilo and is the author of Ma‘i Lepera: Disease and Displacement in Nineteenth-Century Hawai‘i (Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press, 2013).  Her professional interests include research and teaching on the history of disease and medicine, especially as they pertain to Hawai‘i and the Pacific, within a global context.

Kalaupapa peninsulaInglis visits Kalaupapa regularly, and takes a group of UH Hilo students to the peninsula for a service-learning opportunity (for one week) every fall semester. The Smithsonian traveling exhibition, “I Want the Wide American Earth: An Asian Pacific American Story,” celebrates Asian Pacific American history across a multitude of diverse cultures and explores how Asian Pacific Americans have shaped–and been shaped by–the course of the nation’s history.

Cost is $8 for members, $10 for general admission. Pre-purchase tickets at the ‘Imiloa front desk or by phone at 969-9703.

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i is a world-class informal science education center located on the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo campus. ‘Imiloa is a place of life-long learning where the power of Hawai‘i’s cultural traditions, its legacy of exploration and the wonders of astronomy come together to provide inspiration and hope for generations. The Center’s interactive exhibits, 3D full dome planetarium, native landscape, and programs and events engage children, families, visitors and the local community in the wonders of science and technology found in Hawai‘i. It is open to the public from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday (closed Mondays).  For more information, visit the website at www.imiloahawaii.org.

Earthquakes and Explosions: Shocking Events at Kapoho and Halema’uma’u in 1924

Kilauea-1924April 21, 2014 @ 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm Precisely 90 years ago—on April 21, 1924—residents of Kapoho were evacuated as hundreds of earthquakes shook their village.  In the weeks that followed, explosions wracked the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, creating difficult challenges for staff at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory and the Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park.  This evening, using USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory logs, geologic field notes, National Park Service reports, newspaper accounts, photographs, and other records from 1924, long-time HVO volunteer Ben Gaddis tells the tale of Kīlauea’s most violent eruption of the twentieth century from the perspective of the people who lived through it.

 

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Lei Hulu at Lyman Museum

Copy Img0084May 1, 2014 @ 3:15 pm – May 16, 2014 @ 4:15 pm This May, Lei Hulu of Hilo will delight Museum visitors once again with a special exhibit of traditional Hawaiian featherwork by the students of Kumu Doreen Henderson, a master crafter of lei hulu. Examples of featherwork on display include lei papa (flat lei often used as hatbands), kāhili, `uli`uli (feathered gourds and rattles), `ahu`ula (feathered capes), and even an elaborate crested mahiole (helmet). Practitioners of lei hulu have traditionally used feathers from endemic birds such as `apapane, `elapaio, `i`iwi, mamo, and `ō`ō, but with these either endangered, or in the case of mamo and `ō`ō, extinct, they now rely on feathers from ducks, geese, guinea hens, peacocks, pheasants, and quail. Aunty Doreen’s own red-and-yellow lei kamoe (headband) is made up of “regular” goose feathers.

Aunty Doreen learned the art from Kumu Mary Kahihilani Duarte-Kovich, herself a student of the late Aunty Mary Lou Kekuewa, one of Hawaii’s most renowned lei hulu practitioners and a second cousin of Aunty Doreen.  An annual Museum attraction since 2006, this year’s special exhibit will be on display from May 1 through May 16, 2014.

Hawaiian Weapons of War

LYMAN MUSEUM

Alika Tejada, pūkaua (war leader) for the High Chief at Pu`ukoholā Heiau near Kohala, presents a riveting program on the manufacture and use of nā mea kaua, the traditional Hawaiian weapons of war.  What materials were used to fashion the pāhoa (dagger), niho manō pāhoa (shark-tooth dagger), newa (war club), ka`ane (strangling cord), ihe (spear), ko`o (staff), and niho manō hoe (shark-tooth war paddle), and how were they made and used?  What are some of the other little-known, precontact weapons early Hawaiian warriors created and employed so effectively?  Come learn from a true craftsman and practitioner of his culture!

April 7, 2014 @ 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm

Cost: $3; Free for Museum members

 

I Want the Wide American Earth

Wide Earth

I Want the Wide American Earth: An Asian Pacific American Story Traveling Exhibit to Open March 22nd at ‘Imiloa

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center is pleased to host the exhibit “I Want the Wide American Earth: An Asian Pacific American Story,” March 22 – June 1, 2014 as part of a 13-city national tour.

As the only state with an Asian plurality, Hawai‘i lives and breathes its diverse Asian Pacific heritage every day, but a new Smithsonian exhibition opening at the ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center will offer perspectives on our local heritage within the broader context of the entire nation.  The ancestral roots of Asian and Pacific Americans represent more than 50% of the world’s population, extending from East Asia to Southeast Asia, and from South Asia to the Pacific Islands and Polynesia.

In this first exhibition of its kind, the Smithsonian celebrates Asian Pacific American history across a multitude of diverse cultures and explores how Asian Pacific Americans have shaped and been shaped by the course of the nation’s history. “I Want the Wide American Earth” tells the rich and complex stories of the very first Asian immigrants, including their participation in key moments in American history: Asian immigrants panned in the Gold Rush, hammered ties in the Transcontinental Railroad, fought on both sides in the Civil War and helped build the nation’s agricultural system.

Through the decades, Asian immigrants struggled against legal exclusion, manzanar_historical_site_Blue_AAcivil rights violations and unlawful detention, such as the 120,000 Japanese who were interred during World War II. Since the 1960s, vibrant new communities, pan-Asian, Pacific Islander and cross-cultural in make-up, have blossomed.

The banner exhibition is complemented by an e-book, which is a 14-page illustrated adaption of the exhibition. Produced in collaboration with SI Universe Media, creators of the first-ever Asian Pacific American comics anthology, the e-book will tell the Asian Pacific American story in graphic narrative, featuring work by seven Asian Pacific American comic artists. The e-book is free to download and viewable on all tablet devices and e-readers.

The exhibit also features a mobile tour app, which includes interviews with authors Maxine Hong Kingston and Monique Truong; U.S. Secretary of Transportation Norman Mineta; Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center director Konrad Ng; activist Deepa Iyer; and U.S. retired major general Antonio Taguba.

Curated by Lawrence-Ming Bùi Davis, Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center Initiative coordinator, “I Want the Wide American Earth” is a moving, dramatic and evocative narrative of Asian Pacific American history and culture.

The Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center produces programs and exhibitions about the Asian Pacific American experience and works in partnership with organizations across the Smithsonian and beyond to enrich collections and activities about the Asian Pacific American experience. It shares the challenges and stories of America’s fastest-growing communities. It connects treasures and scholars with the public, celebrates long-lived traditions and explores contemporary expressions. The stories it tells are vital to a deeper understanding of the nation and a richer appreciation of Asian Pacific cultures. Visit www.apa.si.edu for more information.

The Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES)has been sharing the wealth of Smithsonian collections and research programs with millions of people outside Washington, D.C., for 60 years. SITES connects Americans to their cultural heritage through a wide range of exhibitions about art, science and history, which are shown wherever people live, work and play.

The National Museum of American History collects, preserves and displays American heritage in the areas of social, political, cultural, scientific and military history. The Museum is located at 14th Street and Constitution Avenue N.W. and is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Check the website for special extended summer hours.

Restoring a faded and yellowed photograph from Hawaii's past

I recently purchased this yellowed and faded photograph at Alan's Antique Shop on Bay Front in Hilo. I got it because it depicts a boy's day celebration on one of the sugar plantations. Unfortunately Allen did not know who the family was or which plantation camp the photo was taken, basically nothing about the photo. So I shelled out $5 for the photo and came home to work my magic. Original condition of photograph

The second photo is after about 3 hours of color correction and adjustments. Wow, right? I am always amazed what I can pull out of an old photo. So even if you think you have a ruined photograph, never give up hope. It is always likely you can salvage the image. But, like I said, this one amazed me. Boys day carp copy 2 smallSo I enlarged areas and was even more amazed. The central family looks fabulous, Mom in her Kimono and dad holding the honored son. Look, it took a while to get a boy, how proud he must have been that day. The boy is draped in a formal kimono, complete with Mon, family crests (those are the white dots) and crashing waves for strength. The girls are looking pretty fine too, see the one holding her purse? And two dogs! Gotta love the Chesterfields Cigarettes poster clinging to the building in the background. That building, given it's size and location, was likely the bath house that held the community furo (bath).chesterfield sign small

The group on the left side had some surprises as well. There's a man sitting on the railing with his leg on the hand rail, slipper about to fall off. Look what he is holding! A photo of, I think, a string of carp from another boys day. Cool. The girls are cute. Doesn't one look upset not to be in the center of the photo, she was probably told to stay on the lanai. The other girls seems giddy, she must know she IS in the photo and happy about it. Maybe families took turns getting their photo taken under the banner. On the plantations, ethnic groups tended to stick together. So this is probably an all Japanese camp.kids on lanai small

Last, I've included a detail of the warrior banner the family was flying. It shows two samurai on horseback. See them?banner

I have several that are similar that I fly during Boy's day (May 5, I've included a photo for you.) DSC_0094_2

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Overall, well worth the $5 and three hours work don't you think? I can't wait to take it back and show Alan. Maybe we'll be able to figure out where this old plantation photograph was taken.

Orchid Greenhouse Tour Now Offered

Akatuka Orchid Gardens has always been a favorite place to send guests looking to purchase Orchid plants to take home. Their retail facilities are beautiful. We are thrilled to share their recent announcement that Akatsuka's will now be offering green house tours. The greenhouse tour will be a guided, behind-the-scenes tours of their orchid greenhouses. Their greenhouses hold orchid plants in various stages of development. Your tour will be guided by one of their expert orchid growers who will show you around the greenhouses, demonstrate how the orchids are cultivated and bred and you'll even be a participant in a grower's activity. A treat for orchid enthusiasts and novices!

For more information contact: http://www.akatsukaorchid.com

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Top 5 Reasons To Fall In Love With Honomu

Once you take a look at Honomu, we are certain you will love it as much as we do, but here are a few reasons why: 1 -The Palms Cliff House Inn - situated on a 3.5 acre private ocean front estate, the Inn has become known state wide for it’s romantic atmosphere and a feel that evokes old Hawaii. Luxury accommodations at value packed pricing ensure a memorable stay.

DSC_0247 2 -Akaka Falls State Park - This is a pleasant self-guided walk through lush tropical vegetation to scenic vista points overlooking the cascading Kahuna Falls and the free-falling 'Akaka Falls, which plunges 442 feet into a stream-eroded gorge.

Akaka Falls 3 -Honomu Town - A sugar camp town dating back to the 1800’s, Honomu town is still the  epitome of hte small Hawaii town. historic store fronts line the avenue through town where you can gaze at antiques and aloha shirts. Locals and visitors alike gather at Mr. Ed’s Bakery for coffee and pastries and to talk story. The town has much to offer the person willing to take a few moments to travel back in time along it’s boardwalk.

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4 -Hakalau Beach Park - Recently renovated, this beach park is a tiny tucked away little gem that is not to be missed. During the day you can cool off with a swim in the river that flows into the ocean and enjoy a picnic lunch at one of the tables under the coconut palms. Ruins of the old sugar mill are still onsite a worth exploring. There is a walk/hike at the back of the park that takes you up old stone steps to a spectacular view of the bay. In the late afternoon/evening you can talk story with the local crowd as they gather around to share stories and local memories.

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5 -The Woodshop Gallery - The place in town to go for a great burger,  the Woodshop Gallery also showcases the work of local island artists. everything from art to jewelry to fine woodworking can be found.

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Need more reasons? Follow us on Facebook to stay in the loop.

Finding Hawaii

John and I recently took a trip to Wisconsin to see family and had a wonderful time. The weather was great, the travel was adventurous - in a good way - and it was terrific to see family that we had not seen for many years. we happened to be in Wisconsin during the Elkhart Antique Fair. Of course we went! It was a two and a half hour drive to get there, but once there we had a wonderful time discovering all the treasures from Hawaii!IMG_6764 These two Mundorff Prints were the first items I spotted. The bright red hibiscus stood out among the hundreds of antique items. They were both crisp and clean, obviously well love by whom ever had owned them before. $20 each was a pretty good price, but too difficult for me to bring home. The images were over sized for carry on, and I was certain the glass would break in shipping. Oh well, on to other treasures.

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I did bring these two lovely trays home home. Both had their original 50's Hawaii woods, Honolulu tag still intact on the back. At almost 24 inches long they were a challenge to fit into my suitcase, but they were in such outstanding condition I could not leave them behind. I'm a sucker for pretty wood.

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This gem almost made me sequel with delight. sitting in a case of costume jewelry who could miss the unmistakable grace and beauty of Ming's Ivory. This Rice Plant pin is a pattern I have not seen in a while. At just under 4 inches long it is a statement piece to be certain. I found a few other Ming's pieces and some unmarked ivory done in a Hawaiian motif.

IMG_6774IMG_6805IMG_6802 The Red Antheriums are marked Mings, but the others are not. The orchid pin is large and has lovely detail, but I do not think it is a Ming's piece.

For those unfamiliar with Ming's jewelry, Wook Moon established Ming's in 1940, expanding to Hawaii, San Francisco, New York, Miami, Houston, Ft. Lauderdale, and Atlanta. Ming's Honolulu offered pieces in gold, sterling, pearls, jade, coral, and ivory, depicting Hawaiian and Asian motifs and hand carved figurals of flowers and natural objects.  The earliest ivory pieces were hand signed "Ming's" in reddish brown ink. Sterling and tinted or dyed ivory pieces were  popular sellers and only the finest African elephant ivory, legally purchased and imported, were used. Wook Moon trained many carvers in the mid-century who went on to individual fame, including Isami Doi and John Roberts.  The pieces are highly sought after here in Hawaii. They are our diamonds.

I'll finish with a few crates that we ended up shipping back to Hawaii. The Hutchenson crate was certainly unexpected. This company produced a lot of the bottles used by the Hawaii soda companies for their bottling needs. The other two are variations from one company for their sugar cubes. They imported Hawaiian sugar to San Francisco where they then processed it into cubes.

It was a great Antiques fair, one I would love to go to again. I understand the Elkheart show is one day, once a year. Well worth the drive, if you have a chane, go. You will enjoy it too.