US Marine Need Our Help

It's Veterans Day Weekend; Let's Help A Veteran

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https://www.gofundme.com/Help-an-Afghanistan-Vet

John has been struggling through a lot of financial difficulty upon returning from Afghanistan. Like many other Veterans he just can’t seem to catch up, let alone get ahead.

I can’t tell you how grateful we would be for your support.  Donating, or sharing the gofundme link with your social network would mean so much to us. A little pocket change from enough people can add up to a big change in John and his families financial situation. We are not shooting for the moon, just enough to keep him out of bankruptcy.

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My Son John is an Honorably Discharged US Marine Veteran who served in Afghanistan. This gofundme request is for financial assistance for him and his family. They are preparing to file for Bankruptcy and I hope together we can help them avoid this.


John has worked hard since his honorable discharge. It took a year and a half for him to get his VA exit exam, during which we paid for his medical care for everything, including what the VA should have been providing him.

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It took John awhile to find employment following his service career when he came home to the Big Island of Hawai‘i. We are an economically depressed community. He wanted to continue to serve with the Marines, but they have no reserve units on the Big Island, so he switched over to the Army reserve. That says a lot right there about his commitment to Country.

https://www.gofundme.com/Help-an-Afghanistan-Vet

He did his best with odds and end jobs until finding an opportunity in bomb removal. He has been a munitions removal specialist for a private military contractor for the majority of his post service time.

This means he worked at sites in the US removing active and possibly active live bombs from former US training sites and most recently the ship yards in San Diego. He risked exposure to toxic chemicals, heavy metals, and live bombs. The work was on and off again as it was dependent upon gov. contracts. He began incurring debt between contracts in order to support his wife and growing family.

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After the birth of his second daughter he decided to change careers and has been in training for a new career in the Railroad industry.  His pay during this time has not been enough to meet his financial needs with a wife and three children. They lived in San Diego while John trained in Salt Lake City. The financial burden of two households became too much.

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I don’t want them to have to file for bankruptcy, but he has navigated low military pay, on and off again gov. contract pay, and very low pay during his recent training period as best he could. I am very proud of what he has managed to do for his family while being financially crippled.  We have assisted him financially to the extent we have been able. But we have nothing left in our own savings to help him further. I’m not asking to get him a free ride as it were. He has always done for others at the expense of himself.

We can find no Veteran assistance programs that would help him either as he is not a homeowner. My son is a hard working Veteran who deserves more than bankruptcy following his service. Please help us help our son and his family avoid bankruptcy. The funds will be used to pay off his family’s debt. 

This money will allow him to avoid bankruptcy  which will allow him to continue his new career with the railroad and a fresh financial start. Currently he is contemplating a high risk private military service contract overseas just to have income for his family.

All our veterans deserve more than these kinds of options, but right now you can help one, my son and his family. It would mean so much to me if you would help. He is a good father, honorable man, and compassionate  human being. He thinks of others before thinking of himself.


They need the funds quickly as he is running out of time to avoid bankruptcy. Please help. No donation is too small. Small change will add up to a big change in this Veteran’s life.

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HAWAII VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK (BIVN) - Pele returns to the Pacific Ocean, after suddenly crossing the emergency road on the coastal plain of Kilauea.

by Big Island Video News on July 26, 2016 at 7:26 am UPDATE (12:40 p.m.) VIDEO: First Look At Hawaii’s New Lava Ocean Entry HAWAII VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK, Hawaii – The 61g lava flow has reached the Pacific Ocean on Hawaii Island. The lava flow began a new ocean entry at 1:30 a.m. this morning, lava tour guides report. Shane Turpin of Lava Ocean Tours, Inc. was one of the first on the scene – by sea – to provide images of the new entry. Yesterday, the lava crossed the coastal emergency road that connects the Chain of Craters Road in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park to Kalapana. From that point it was only a matter of hours before the lava reached the sea.

The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory said the last time the lava met the ocean was in August 2013. The ocean entry stopped when the eruptive activity at Puʻu ʻŌʻō changed, sending flows to towards the east rather than the south. The new direction held for nearly three years – and included the infamous June 27 lava flow that threatened the village of Pahoa – before a new change in the lava flow redirected the activity back towards the coastal plain on Kīlauea’s south flank.

Mahalo Jared Goodwin and Lava Ocean Tours for the great pictures.

Hawaiian Havens: The Top 10 Hotels on the Big Island

The Culture Trip By:Caroline Milne, Updated: 25 December 2015

Excerpt from this article:

Hawaii’s Big Island is a textbook tropical paradise. Home to a host of natural wonders such as active volcanoes, black sand beaches, hidden waterfalls and seemingly endless jungle hikes, the island is a heavenly destination for active adventure-seekers, as well as those seeking a much-needed vacation to sprawl out on the beach and de-stress. Whatever your island fantasy involves, we’ve rounded up the top ten hotels for every type of traveler, so you can find the best accommodations for your style and budget.

Palms Cliff House Inn

Palms Cliff House Inn is a Victorian style bed and breakfast situated atop a lush Oceanside property. If you’re looking for accommodations on the Northeastern side of the island (near Hilo), Palms Cliff is the destination for you. This luxurious B&B has charm to spare, enchanting guests with its grand architecture and awe-inspiring views of the formidable Homonu Cliffs. Here you can let the rhythmic sounds of the ocean lull you to sleep at night, then wake at sunrise to a delicious breakfast. This oasis of old-world relaxation will leave you pampered and rested, though if you’re feeling bold you’ll find a range of nature activities at your doorstep, from snorkeling and swimming to hiking those striking cliffs.

Price: Luxury

Watch out for: the private jacuzzi and romantic views in Room 8

28-3514 Mamalahoa Hwy, Honomu, Island of Hawaii, HI, +808 963 6076

June Begins the Bon Dance Season on the Big Island

June has arrived and with it the Bon Dance season on the Big Island. If you are visiting the island and have an opportunity to attend you should. Bon dance in Hawaii is a very social time. There will be local food for sale, Taiko drummers, men and women in Yukata (not required) and lots of dancing and music.

What is Bon dance? A celebration honoring  and remembering your ancestors. Spending an evening thinking about loved ones who have passed does not have to be depressing. Bon dance is one way to celebrate their memories while showing them that your life is moving foreword without them, and that your life is full of joy. What could be better than that?

Below is an online article published in Hawaii Magazine about Bon Dance as well as the 2016 schedule for Bon Dance, and a practice schedule if you would like to learn a dance or two. Lots of people just follow along at a Bon dance, so don't feel as if you have to know the dance steps. It's really all about having fun.

Workshop Tickets on sale Now at 'Imiloa

   In celebration of the 53rd Annual Merrie Monarch Festival, ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center will host three days of cultural enrichment programming, Wednesday, March 30 through Friday, April 1. This series is organized to complement and honor one of Merrie Monarch’s major purposes: the perpetuation, preservation and promotion of the art of hula and Hawaiian culture through education.

“The Merrie Monarch Festival is an important platform for sharing the history and culture of Hawai’i with thousands of people worldwide. It is a privilege each year for ‘Imiloa to help extend the impact of the festival by offering related cultural enrichment programs for the benefit of both our local and visitor communities,” states Ka’iu Kimura, Executive Director of ‘Imiloa.

MW-020514-mossmanThe opening day of events (March 30) at ‘Imiloa will showcase Hānau ka Ua me ka Makani, a recent publication on Hawaiian rain names and lore by Kamehameha Schools educators, Collette Akana and Kiele Gonzalez, from 10:00 am to 11:30 am. A live musical performance by Hilo’s own Hōkū-award winner, Mark Yamanaka will follow that afternoon from 1:00 pm to 2:30 pm.

The second day of events (March 31) will feature He Inoa no Hiʻiakaikapoliopele, A Papakū Makawalu presentation from 10:00 am to 11:30 am on Hi’iakaikapolipele. The presentation is by Pomai Brandt and Ku‘ulei Higashi Kanahele, who is a PhD student in Hawaiian and Indigenous Language and Culture Revitalization at Keʻelikōlani College of Hawaiian Language at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo. Afternoon Hula performances by UNUKUPUKUPU will include UNUOLEHUA I and UNUOLEHUA II, under the direction of Dr. Taupōuri Tangarō from 1:00 pm to 2:30 pm.  

The third and final day (April 1) will feature the hula drama Hānau Ke Aliʻi: Born is a Chief, performed by Hālau Nā Kīpuʻupuʻu under the direction of Kumu Hula Michah Kamohoali’i from 10:00 am to 11:30 am. The final event of our programming will feature hula performances by Hula Hālau O Kou Lima Nani Ē, under the direction of Kumu Hula ʻIwalani Kalima at 1:00 pm to 2:30 pm.

All Cultural Enrichment Programs will take place in ‘Imiloa’s Moanahōkū Hall. Tickets to each event will include access to ‘Imiloa’s interactive Exhibit Hall. Pre-sale tickets will be available for purchase on Tuesday, March 15 at ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center’s front desk, or by calling 808-932-8901. General Admission ticket prices are $10, and $8 for members. A limited supply of tickets will be available on the day of event for $15.

Living Earth-Friendly on an Island.

One aspect of living in paradise that many people don't think about is that everything, and I mean everything, is flown inn or shipped in by barge. Toilet paper, mail, food, building supplies, you name it. If it is not grown here, it is shipped in. Even if it something is made here, some part of it had to be shipped in, glue, nails, tools, tec. So when there is is mis-hap here at the inn, we try to repair items instead of running out to the stores and buying a replacement. After all, trash is not shipped off island, that is one thing that remains here. When you live on an island, you discover very quickly, just how precious space is. Recently we had such a mishap with some guests and a lamp was damaged beyond repair, life is full of accidents, no harm, no foul. Since the lamps needed to match it was a matter of what to do next. Thank goodness we live in a community (Island mentality) that embraces garage sales, Church sales, and temple sales. So bright and early Saturday morning we were off on the hunt. Right away I found a pair of lamps that would fit our needs.

   Here is one in it's "as found" condition. Yes, it is in rough shape, rusty harp, chipping paint, but good solid bones. I pulled out some paint from my craft supplies and got to work.

   A soft grey was just the thing to compliment the room it was headed into. I also brushed gold pigment on the upper edges of the lamp base for some highlight. I think the end result is fantastic! But most important, we added one less thing to our local landfill. Aloha!

     

Hawaii Magazine Reader's Choice Winner, Again!

Excited to announce that for the third year in a row we have won the Reader's Choice Award for Best Bed & Breakfast. Congratulations to all the winners in this year's list. On the stands now, go grab your copy! 


Year after year we are honored to receive the publics acknowledgement of our great staff and wonderful B&B. We pour our hearts into this place are are just thrilled (even after 15 years) when others say "well done!" Mahalo to everyone, most especially our staff, without whom, we could not exceed our guests expectations. 

 

  

  

   

  

  

Honored Again As The Best Bed & Breakfast in East Hawaii

The Palms Cliff House has the honor of being named the Best Bed & Breakfast in East Hawaii by readers of the Hawaii Tribune-Herald Newspaper for 2013. The Inn also won in 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009 and 2005. John and Michele Gamble share the honor with their hard working staff, some of whom are shown below.. “We are able to be so successful because we have such wonderful and dedicated staff that share our dream for this very special place” said owner Michele Gamble.

Celebrating fourteen years in operation the Gambles feel this is the perfect pat on the back for a job well done by their neighbors and peers. “We all work so hard to provide a quality experience while still providing value for the guest” commented John Gamble, “The economy is really tight for everyone, and yet, we are still providing value for every dollar a guest spends with us.”

“We are so thankful to the people of the Big Island for giving us this honor again this year. There are so many Bed and Breakfasts out there who are working hard and providing a quality experience, so we understand what a tremendous honor it is to be given this award by the people who live here” Michele said in conclusion.

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Ma‘i Ho‘oka‘awale ‘Ohana & The Journey Into Exile

by vrecinto on April 23rd, 2014

Ma‘i Ho‘oka‘awale ‘Ohana & The Journey Into Exile: Hansen’s Disease in Hawai‘i  “I Want the Wide American Earth: An Asian Pacific American Story” ‘Imiloa Lecture Series

The seldom told stories of Hawai‘i’s Hansen’s Disease sufferers who werenupepa clipping exiled to Molokai will come alive in their own words when ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center hosts Dr. Kerri Inglis, Chair, Department of History at UH Hilo, for her talk “Ma‘i Ho‘oka‘awale ‘Ohana & the Journey into Exile: Hansen’s Disease in Hawai‘i, 1866-1969” on Thursday, May 1, at 4:00 p.m. The talk is presented as part of a continuing series being offered in conjunction with the Smithsonian traveling exhibition, “I Want the Wide American Earth: An Asian Pacific American Story.” Attendees may also tour the exhibit, which is on display until June 1, 2014 as part of a 13-city national tour.

From 1866 to 1969, approximately 8,000 persons were quarantined or exiled to the leprosy settlement at Kalaupapa.  Endeavoring to recover the voices of the patients who lived through this significant moment in Hawaiian history, Inglis will present her research on the letters and articles that patients and their loved ones wrote to the Board of Health and Hawaiian language newspapers in the 19th century, and share oral histories that were collected in the 20th century.  Together these records tell the story of a disease, a changing society’s reaction to that disease, and the long lasting consequences of that experience for Hawai‘i and its people.

Kerri A. Inglis serves as Chair of the Department of History and Associate Professor of Hawaiian & Pacific Islands History at UH-Hilo and is the author of Ma‘i Lepera: Disease and Displacement in Nineteenth-Century Hawai‘i (Honolulu: University of Hawai‘i Press, 2013).  Her professional interests include research and teaching on the history of disease and medicine, especially as they pertain to Hawai‘i and the Pacific, within a global context.

Kalaupapa peninsulaInglis visits Kalaupapa regularly, and takes a group of UH Hilo students to the peninsula for a service-learning opportunity (for one week) every fall semester. The Smithsonian traveling exhibition, “I Want the Wide American Earth: An Asian Pacific American Story,” celebrates Asian Pacific American history across a multitude of diverse cultures and explores how Asian Pacific Americans have shaped–and been shaped by–the course of the nation’s history.

Cost is $8 for members, $10 for general admission. Pre-purchase tickets at the ‘Imiloa front desk or by phone at 969-9703.

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i is a world-class informal science education center located on the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo campus. ‘Imiloa is a place of life-long learning where the power of Hawai‘i’s cultural traditions, its legacy of exploration and the wonders of astronomy come together to provide inspiration and hope for generations. The Center’s interactive exhibits, 3D full dome planetarium, native landscape, and programs and events engage children, families, visitors and the local community in the wonders of science and technology found in Hawai‘i. It is open to the public from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday (closed Mondays).  For more information, visit the website at www.imiloahawaii.org.

HAKALAU FOREST NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE: OPEN HOUSE

 iiviHakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge

12 Mile Keanakolua (AKA Mana) Rd East Slope of Mauna Kea Hilo, Hawaii  96720 www.fws.gov/refuge/hakalau_forest/


Dates

April 19, 2014 9:00am - 3:00pm Please register by Thursday, April 17.


Description

You are invited to attend an Open House at Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge on April 19, 2014. Guided rainforest hikes will be offered between 9:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. to observe rare and colorful native birds and plants. Its a great family oriented opportunity to see the refuge and the cooperative reforestation work, tour the green house operation, and walk in high elevation ancient forests at Hakalau Forest NWR. Hear some of the compelling stories of our rare and beautiful mints and lobeliads rescued from the brink of extinction and now given hope by citizen volunteers working side by side with refuge staff to protect and restore this precious native forest. The day will also feature exhibits by our partner organizations.

Visitors must provide their own four-wheel-drive transportation to the Refuge, which is a two-hour drive from Hilo, Waimea or Kona. Reservations are required and may be obtained by calling the refuge office at 808-443-2300 by April 17. Free admission.


Contact Info

Cashell Villa USFWS Wildlife Refuge Specialist- Event Coordinator 808-443-2300 ext. 229 cashell_villa@fws.gov

Earthquakes and Explosions: Shocking Events at Kapoho and Halema’uma’u in 1924

Kilauea-1924April 21, 2014 @ 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm Precisely 90 years ago—on April 21, 1924—residents of Kapoho were evacuated as hundreds of earthquakes shook their village.  In the weeks that followed, explosions wracked the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, creating difficult challenges for staff at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory and the Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park.  This evening, using USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory logs, geologic field notes, National Park Service reports, newspaper accounts, photographs, and other records from 1924, long-time HVO volunteer Ben Gaddis tells the tale of Kīlauea’s most violent eruption of the twentieth century from the perspective of the people who lived through it.

 

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Lei Hulu at Lyman Museum

Copy Img0084May 1, 2014 @ 3:15 pm – May 16, 2014 @ 4:15 pm This May, Lei Hulu of Hilo will delight Museum visitors once again with a special exhibit of traditional Hawaiian featherwork by the students of Kumu Doreen Henderson, a master crafter of lei hulu. Examples of featherwork on display include lei papa (flat lei often used as hatbands), kāhili, `uli`uli (feathered gourds and rattles), `ahu`ula (feathered capes), and even an elaborate crested mahiole (helmet). Practitioners of lei hulu have traditionally used feathers from endemic birds such as `apapane, `elapaio, `i`iwi, mamo, and `ō`ō, but with these either endangered, or in the case of mamo and `ō`ō, extinct, they now rely on feathers from ducks, geese, guinea hens, peacocks, pheasants, and quail. Aunty Doreen’s own red-and-yellow lei kamoe (headband) is made up of “regular” goose feathers.

Aunty Doreen learned the art from Kumu Mary Kahihilani Duarte-Kovich, herself a student of the late Aunty Mary Lou Kekuewa, one of Hawaii’s most renowned lei hulu practitioners and a second cousin of Aunty Doreen.  An annual Museum attraction since 2006, this year’s special exhibit will be on display from May 1 through May 16, 2014.

Hawaiian Weapons of War

LYMAN MUSEUM

Alika Tejada, pūkaua (war leader) for the High Chief at Pu`ukoholā Heiau near Kohala, presents a riveting program on the manufacture and use of nā mea kaua, the traditional Hawaiian weapons of war.  What materials were used to fashion the pāhoa (dagger), niho manō pāhoa (shark-tooth dagger), newa (war club), ka`ane (strangling cord), ihe (spear), ko`o (staff), and niho manō hoe (shark-tooth war paddle), and how were they made and used?  What are some of the other little-known, precontact weapons early Hawaiian warriors created and employed so effectively?  Come learn from a true craftsman and practitioner of his culture!

April 7, 2014 @ 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm

Cost: $3; Free for Museum members

 

John Howard Pierce: Photographs of Hawai’i Island 1958-1969

Pierce-extended-banner July 26, 2013 through June 28, 2014

(original closing date has been extended from January 11,2014 to June 28, 2014)

John Howard Pierce, a former Hawaii Tribune-Herald reporter and Lyman Museum curator, was an avid photographer who meticulously documented his beloved home of Hawai’i Island in the mid-twentieth century, a pivotal period defined and galvanized by the admission of Hawai’i into the United States in 1959.

The photographs in this exhibit–a small but representative sampling of the John Howard Pierce Collection–provide a view to this recent past, revealing a community ambitiously growing, changing, and constructing a new future; remembering and reclaiming its traditions; and savoring the simple pleasures of everyday life.

We invite you to view Hawai’i Island of half a century ago through the lens of John Howard Pierce, whose photographs help the Museum tell the story of Hawai’i, its islands, and its people.

 

 

Merrie Monarch Hawaiian Culture Enrichment 2014 Workshops at Imiloa

April 23 to 25, 2014

In April, the week after Easter, the highly anticipated Merrie Monarch Hula Festival and Competition in Hilo will be under way. During this special week, ‘Imiloa will offer a three-day showcase of musical performances and cultural presentations in support of the Merrie Monarch Festival, providing visitors to Hawai‘i and its residents an opportunity to learn about the history and cultural significance of hula and its practitioners. All showcase sessions cover a wide range of hula topics.
This year’s programs consist of a wonderful mix of cultural presentations such as Haku Mele Masters with a prominent group of Hawaiian poets and songwriters, a special presentation on Hawaiian protocol for entering the Waonahele or forests by Dr. Taupouri Tangaro and Kekuhi Kealiikanakaolehaililani, and musical performances by Manu Boyd, Hoku Zuttermeister, and Kuana Torres. Share in the magic of Merrie Monarch Week at ‘Imiloa!
In order to continue to offer more educational enrichment programs, event program is by admission: $6 for members, $8 for non-members, per session. Seating is limited. To ensure a spot for a session, we recommend that you purchase tickets in advance. Tickets are non-refundable. Ticket pre-sales start Tuesday, March 25th. Please call 969-9703 or visit the guest service desk at ‘Imiloa to purchase tickets.

2014 Schedule 

 

Wednesday, April 23
10:00am:
  Presentation, "Haku Mele Masters of Our Time"
A panel of celebrated, contemporary Haku Mele (composers) discuss the art involved in the composition of Hawaiian songs, providing insight into the elements that inspire haku mele, the practice of documenting our history through poetry and song and the performance of mele as a means of storytelling.

Speakers include Larry Kimura, Kainani Kahaunaele, Manu Boyd and Manaiakalani Kalua.

Moderated by Dr. Hiapo Perreira.
1:00pm:
Musical Performance by Manu Boyd. Noted Hawaiian composer, kumu hula and Na Hoku Hanohano Award winning recording artist, Manu Boyd performs mele from his latest solo release.
Manu Boyd is recognized as a Hawaiian language and cultural expert, composer, arranger, singer, chanter, choreographer, producer and writer. Since June 2007, he has served as Hawaiian cultural director at Royal Hawaiian Center at Helumoa, Waikiki, the world-class shopping/dining/entertainment hub owned by Kamehameha Schools and managed by The Festival Companies.
Manu leads the award-winning hula school, Halau O Ke ‘A‘ali‘i Ku Makani, est. 1997 - first-place overall winners at the 2012 Merrie Monarch Festival.  From 1986 - 2012, Manu led the well-known Hawaiian recording ensemble Ho‘okena, multiple Na Hoku Hanohano Awards winner and two-time Grammy nominee.
Thursday, April 24
10:00am:
'OiwiTV's Presentation on the original series “Na Loea: The Masters.” The original film series by 'OiwiTV promotes and perpetuates kuana'ike Hawai'i, or a Hawaiian worldview, through the engaging stories of a select group of masters whose collective knowledge represents an amazing cross section of cultural wisdom.
This kuana'ike is embedded in values that influence all aspects of a person’s way of thinking, being, and acting. These values are dependent on Hawaiian norms including a symbiotic tie with the land, the interdependence of language and culture, the significance of interpersonal relationships, and the practical, continuous application of traditional knowledge. Engage with Na loea for a look into what is helping to keep Hawai'i Hawai'i.
For more on the Na Loea series and 'Oiwi TV, visit oiwi.tv. LOEA: Jerry Ongies “Hawai'iloa: Rebuilding the Legend” While the ancient art of non-instrument navigation has been rekindled throughout Polynesia, the knowledge of canoe building has been largely forgotten except for a select few artisans. Following in the wake of her sister canoe Hokule'a, the Hawai'iloa canoe was hulled from two spruce logs gifted from the tribes of Alaska to prove the ingenuity of traditional building and voyaging techniques. But with the passing of her original builder – Wright “Wrighto” Bowman – Hawai'iloa was left to wait for another master craftsman. With a steady hand and unwavering dedication, Jerry Ongies is breathing new life into one of Hawai'i's most storied sailing canoes.

LOEA: Mac Poepoe, “Malama Mo'omomi” For locals on the rural Hawaiian island of Moloka'i, the “ice box” isn’t just the refrigerator in their kitchens but the abundant ocean that still provides a main source of sustenance for that community; a community that has fought against development and many modern “conveniences” with great resolve to maintain their unique island lifestyle. Malama Mo'omomi features “Mac” Poepoe, a native Hawaiian fisherman and community leader on Moloka'i, who has dedicated his life to sharing his knowledge of traditional resource management with the hope of ensuring that this ocean “ice box” will be well-stocked for generations to come. Mac’s wealth of knowledge and expertise accumulated over his years of growing up in the rigor and lifestyle of a Hawaiian family that has been fishing and maintaining the sustainability of these waters for generations. (It could be said that) Mac is one of a small group (or “one of a dying breed”) of skilled fisherman who approach their practice with a passion not just for the sport of it but to hone and perpetuate their skill and expertise in managing Hawai'i's ocean ecosystems, which is critical to the sustainability of Hawai‘i and its people. This humble fisherman is a giant resource for Hawai'i's future.

LOEA: Keone Nunes, “Ancestral Ink” This is the story of traditional Hawaiian kakau (tattoo) artist, Keone Nunes, and the journey of cultural re-discovery inherent in kakau uhi (tattooing). The process of kakau uhi is one where the artist guides their subjects down a path of self-discovery, revealing life lessons of who they are and where they come from. Traditional kakau is an art that was nearly lost to Hawaiians, but Keone’s perseverance to learn, practice and teach this craft has been a critical determiner of its survival and resurgence in the Hawaiian community today. This piece was shot primarily on the Leeward coast of O'ahu in the Nanakuli and Wai'anae communities, where Keone resides and practices his art of kakau uhi.

1:00pm:
Musical Performance by Hoku Zuttermeister. Hoku Zuttermeister, winner of numerous Na Hoku Hanohano Awards, including Male Vocalist of the Year, Entertainer of the Year and Hawaiian Album of the Year, performs timeless Hawaiian music from his album, ‘Aina Kupuna, and shares memories of his great-grandmother, Hula Master, Kau‘i Zuttermeister.
Hoku comes from a Hawaiian family dynasty that encompasses both the hula and music communities.  His great-grandmother, Kau‘i Zuttermeister penned the beloved song, “Na Pua Lei ‘Ilima,” and his great-aunt is Kumu Hula Noe Zuttermeister.
Hoku’s love of Hawaiian music was inspired by great Hawaiian composers and musicians like Kawena Puku‘i, Maddy Lam and Frank Kawaikapuokalani Hewett, Genoa Keawe, the Brothers Cazimero and many others. He takes their songs to heart and re-interprets them in his own style with his wide vocal range and versatile instrumentation. Hoku says, “it’s more about the heart and feel of the song than the notes and chords.”
Friday, April 25
10:00am:
Presentation "He Inoa No Hi'iaka"
This is a special presentation on Hawaiian protocol for entering the Waonahele and its importance to Hula by Dr. Taupouri Tangaro and Kekuhi Kealiikanakaoleohaililani
1:00pm: 
Musical Performance by Kuana Torres.
Coming from an impressive lineage of musicians, including Bill Ali‘iloa Lincoln, Victor Kala, the Lim Family and George Holokai, Kuana Torres began composing, arranging and playing traditional Hawaiian music at an early age. In 1995 Kuana, with Kehau Tamure, formed the award wining duo, Na Palapalai. From the meteoric rise of their debut CD, Makana ‘Olu, they have maintained a prominent presence in the local and international Hawaiian music and hula scene.

Kuana released his first greatly anticipated solo CD in 2011 and went on to win seven Na Hoku Hanohano awards in 2012, including Album of the Year, Song of the Year and Male Vocalist of the Year awards. Fans know Kuana for his incredible vocal range, while fellow musicians seek him out for his songwriting, arranging and producing talents. Kuana continues to set the pace for talented, local musicians with a steady stream of new compositions that are sure to become Hawaiian music classics.

Panoramic Eggs

‘Imiloa welcomes accomplished artist and designer, Eileen Tokita. EileenTokita has been creating and teaching Faberge’ Eggs for over 40 years.  With her own unique signature design, she has garnered world acclaim from some of the most respected artists and has even been featured at the White House.  Eileen is a master at her craft and has created some of the most intricate and stunning creations from a variety of real eggs. Eileen is a native of Seattle, Washington and currently resides in Honolulu.  In celebration of Spring, we are excited to offer a class with Eileen to make the following project from a real duck egg.   Panoramic Egg Classtokita egg

  • Saturday, April 5
  • 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. in the ‘Imiloa Classroom
  • Cost for class and kit: $50 members, $65 non-members
  • Please contact the front desk to enroll for the class.  808-969-9703
  • enrollment deadline is March 25.

Space is limited so sign up soon!  Supplies will be provided, however the following are optional for your convenience:  Old kitchen towel, blow dryer, small sharp scissors, cuticle scissors.

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i is located at 600 ‘Imiloa Place in Hilo, off Komohana and Nowelo Streets at the UH Hilo Science and Technology Park. For more information, go to www.imiloahawaii.org, or call (808) 969-9703.

I Want the Wide American Earth

Wide Earth

I Want the Wide American Earth: An Asian Pacific American Story Traveling Exhibit to Open March 22nd at ‘Imiloa

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center is pleased to host the exhibit “I Want the Wide American Earth: An Asian Pacific American Story,” March 22 – June 1, 2014 as part of a 13-city national tour.

As the only state with an Asian plurality, Hawai‘i lives and breathes its diverse Asian Pacific heritage every day, but a new Smithsonian exhibition opening at the ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center will offer perspectives on our local heritage within the broader context of the entire nation.  The ancestral roots of Asian and Pacific Americans represent more than 50% of the world’s population, extending from East Asia to Southeast Asia, and from South Asia to the Pacific Islands and Polynesia.

In this first exhibition of its kind, the Smithsonian celebrates Asian Pacific American history across a multitude of diverse cultures and explores how Asian Pacific Americans have shaped and been shaped by the course of the nation’s history. “I Want the Wide American Earth” tells the rich and complex stories of the very first Asian immigrants, including their participation in key moments in American history: Asian immigrants panned in the Gold Rush, hammered ties in the Transcontinental Railroad, fought on both sides in the Civil War and helped build the nation’s agricultural system.

Through the decades, Asian immigrants struggled against legal exclusion, manzanar_historical_site_Blue_AAcivil rights violations and unlawful detention, such as the 120,000 Japanese who were interred during World War II. Since the 1960s, vibrant new communities, pan-Asian, Pacific Islander and cross-cultural in make-up, have blossomed.

The banner exhibition is complemented by an e-book, which is a 14-page illustrated adaption of the exhibition. Produced in collaboration with SI Universe Media, creators of the first-ever Asian Pacific American comics anthology, the e-book will tell the Asian Pacific American story in graphic narrative, featuring work by seven Asian Pacific American comic artists. The e-book is free to download and viewable on all tablet devices and e-readers.

The exhibit also features a mobile tour app, which includes interviews with authors Maxine Hong Kingston and Monique Truong; U.S. Secretary of Transportation Norman Mineta; Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center director Konrad Ng; activist Deepa Iyer; and U.S. retired major general Antonio Taguba.

Curated by Lawrence-Ming Bùi Davis, Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center Initiative coordinator, “I Want the Wide American Earth” is a moving, dramatic and evocative narrative of Asian Pacific American history and culture.

The Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center produces programs and exhibitions about the Asian Pacific American experience and works in partnership with organizations across the Smithsonian and beyond to enrich collections and activities about the Asian Pacific American experience. It shares the challenges and stories of America’s fastest-growing communities. It connects treasures and scholars with the public, celebrates long-lived traditions and explores contemporary expressions. The stories it tells are vital to a deeper understanding of the nation and a richer appreciation of Asian Pacific cultures. Visit www.apa.si.edu for more information.

The Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES)has been sharing the wealth of Smithsonian collections and research programs with millions of people outside Washington, D.C., for 60 years. SITES connects Americans to their cultural heritage through a wide range of exhibitions about art, science and history, which are shown wherever people live, work and play.

The National Museum of American History collects, preserves and displays American heritage in the areas of social, political, cultural, scientific and military history. The Museum is located at 14th Street and Constitution Avenue N.W. and is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Check the website for special extended summer hours.

Restoring a faded and yellowed photograph from Hawaii's past

I recently purchased this yellowed and faded photograph at Alan's Antique Shop on Bay Front in Hilo. I got it because it depicts a boy's day celebration on one of the sugar plantations. Unfortunately Allen did not know who the family was or which plantation camp the photo was taken, basically nothing about the photo. So I shelled out $5 for the photo and came home to work my magic. Original condition of photograph

The second photo is after about 3 hours of color correction and adjustments. Wow, right? I am always amazed what I can pull out of an old photo. So even if you think you have a ruined photograph, never give up hope. It is always likely you can salvage the image. But, like I said, this one amazed me. Boys day carp copy 2 smallSo I enlarged areas and was even more amazed. The central family looks fabulous, Mom in her Kimono and dad holding the honored son. Look, it took a while to get a boy, how proud he must have been that day. The boy is draped in a formal kimono, complete with Mon, family crests (those are the white dots) and crashing waves for strength. The girls are looking pretty fine too, see the one holding her purse? And two dogs! Gotta love the Chesterfields Cigarettes poster clinging to the building in the background. That building, given it's size and location, was likely the bath house that held the community furo (bath).chesterfield sign small

The group on the left side had some surprises as well. There's a man sitting on the railing with his leg on the hand rail, slipper about to fall off. Look what he is holding! A photo of, I think, a string of carp from another boys day. Cool. The girls are cute. Doesn't one look upset not to be in the center of the photo, she was probably told to stay on the lanai. The other girls seems giddy, she must know she IS in the photo and happy about it. Maybe families took turns getting their photo taken under the banner. On the plantations, ethnic groups tended to stick together. So this is probably an all Japanese camp.kids on lanai small

Last, I've included a detail of the warrior banner the family was flying. It shows two samurai on horseback. See them?banner

I have several that are similar that I fly during Boy's day (May 5, I've included a photo for you.) DSC_0094_2

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Overall, well worth the $5 and three hours work don't you think? I can't wait to take it back and show Alan. Maybe we'll be able to figure out where this old plantation photograph was taken.

Welcoming the New Year with Kadamatsu!

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Our Kadomatsu is up and welcoming not only the ancestral spirits, but our guests as well. For those unfamiliar with the tradition of the Kadomatsu let me try to explain. A kadomatsu, or "gate pine" is a traditional Japanese decoration of the New Year placed in front of homes or in businesses to welcome ancestral spirits of the harvest. They are placed after Christmas are considered temporary housing for the spirits. Designs for kadomatsu vary depending on region but are typically made of pine, bamboo, and sometimes ume tree sprigs which represent longevity, prosperity and steadfastness, respectively. The fundamental function of the New Year ceremonies is to honor and receive the toshigami (deity), who will then bring bounty and bestow the ancestors' blessing on everyone." After January 15 the spirits dwelling within the kadomatsu are released when it is burned.

The central portion of the kadomatsu is formed from three large bamboo shoots. Similar to several traditions of ikebana (Japanese flower arrangement), the shoots are set at different heights and represent heaven, humanity, and earth with heaven being the highest and earth being the lowest. After binding all the elements of the kadomatsu, it is bound with newly woven straw rope.

We enjoy sharing this tradition with our guests each year as we get ready to usher in the New Year, hopefully filled with health and prosperity.
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Orchid Greenhouse Tour Now Offered

Akatuka Orchid Gardens has always been a favorite place to send guests looking to purchase Orchid plants to take home. Their retail facilities are beautiful. We are thrilled to share their recent announcement that Akatsuka's will now be offering green house tours. The greenhouse tour will be a guided, behind-the-scenes tours of their orchid greenhouses. Their greenhouses hold orchid plants in various stages of development. Your tour will be guided by one of their expert orchid growers who will show you around the greenhouses, demonstrate how the orchids are cultivated and bred and you'll even be a participant in a grower's activity. A treat for orchid enthusiasts and novices!

For more information contact: http://www.akatsukaorchid.com

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