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September 30, 2012

The Manaʻo Behind the Poster for this yearʻs 2012 Wayfinding & Navigation Festival

By: Michele Gamble

Below youʻll find this yearʻs 2012 Wayfinding & Navigation Poster beautifully done by our Student Assistant, Jared Haʻo. This poster holds a lot of kaona, or hidden meaning that only a few may be able to recognize, so for those who may not, I would like to share the meaning behind the various elements and why they were specifically chosen to represent our festival:

 

 

Faafaite, the Polynesian voyaging canoe from Tahiti
This photograph taken by Danee Hazama, is a magnificent shot of the Faafaite, Polynesian voyaging canoe from Tahiti, departing from a point on Kaho‘olawe named Kealaikahiki, the pathway to Tahiti. This is the first time a canoe has departed for Tahiti this way in more than 750 years. Did you know that ʻImiloa has a direct connection to this monumental event? Our very own Associate Director & Navigator-In-Residence, Chad Kālepa Baybayan, was the Master Navigator of this historic voyage that reopened a voyaging path and connection that had not been sailed for centuries! 

Kanaloa
Kanaloa, known as the god of the sea, ocean, wayfinding & navigation, as well as many other things, is also the ancient name for Kahoʻolawe. Incorporated into our poster are a few of the many kinolau, or forms of Kanaloa. One representation is the ocean, two is the island of Kahoʻolawe, three is the waʻa and the action of navigating it, four is the maiʻa or banana leaf, his plant form, and five is the whale. For many cultures, even those outside of the Pacific, the whale is a universal representation of the ocean that reminds us that no mater where we are in the world, we are all connected to one another.

Mai Ka Piko Mai A Hoʻi, Return to Kanaloa
This yearʻs theme has so many layers and levels of depth to it. Whether you interpret it as a return to the island of Kanaloa, (Kahoʻolawe) or the return to the ways and practices that connect us with the sea, or even a realization that it is our kuleana, responsibility, to care for the ocean that surrounds us, then yes, you are correct. In essence, it doesn’t matter how you interpret it, what really matters is that you answer the call.

Mahalo hou to Danee for the photo and to Jared for an awesome job. Please feel free to share this flyer with your family and friends and if youʻre with your with them and you see this flyer around town, please feel free to share this manaʻo and to invite them to this yearʻs ʻImiloa Wayfinding & Navigation Festival!
For information on the Wayfinding Festival at ‘Imiloa, please visit their website at: http://www.imiloahawaii.org/calendar/month_view/month:October+2012

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